Category Archives: Voices of Aloha on Magical Maui

If you love Maui, want to know more about the visitor experience…

..are planning a trip, or even a longtime local you will enjoy more than 60 short tales of Hawaiians, Musicians, Artists, entrepreneurs and colorful characters and more . Purchase book here based on 10 years of  popular award-winning columns in Lahaina News by Norm Bezane SCROLL DOWN FOR MORE FROM AUTHOR NORM BEZANE.

Amazon posts first reviews on my fourth book.

Two reviews have captured the essence of Voices of Aloha on Magical Maui.

“This is one of the best sources… to learn of other peoples’ take on the Maui experience. There were a few items I had not found in the standard histories of the Hawaiian nation. Good to know. But best, to me, were the short visits with Mauians of all sorts – This is a book you can read straight through, or dip into here and there as the spirit moves. It’s great!”

And a second review:

“This book was very helpful to me as a new resident .on the island. For one thing it is kind of a primer on the culture offering insights in short essays on the Hawaii of old and the major changes from arrival of missionaries to the plantation and later tourism transformed the island. The author wrote stories about everyday people, some funny, to give me a better sense of the people I may be able to meet in my comings and goings. In a sense it is a kind of guide to living here.”

MODERN HULA CELEBRATES MAUI CULTURE

An amazing 70 years ago when large number of visitors began to visit Maui Hawaiians abandoned glitzy costumes for those traditional.

Why are these The Ultimate Maui Visitors?

Featured: One of 60 tales of remarkable people who visit or live on beautiful Maui from page 43,  Voices of Aloha on Magical Maui:

THEY HANG OUT at the Tiki Bar, often after a summer of sailing around the San Juan Islands in the Northwest. Meet them and the realization comes quickly that they perfectly represent the passion so many have for Maui.

Frequent visitors Gary Bodine and Chris Marcotte, often listen to some 300 Hawaiian songs Gary  on their iPod on their boat back home in Washington State. (continued below).

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The couple, dividing their time between Maui and Buckley, Washington, regularly cruising the San Juan Islands. Other boaters think they are nuts playing Iz and Grammy winner George Kahumoku on their boat, but they just smile and pretend they are back on Maui. In their own words, this is their story:

 

Gary:

Voices of Aloha on Magical Maui moon come up over the water. It was absolutely beautiful.”

“We loved it so much the rst time we came I wanted to cry when we left. We came for nine days and extended for three more. Normally, we come for a minimum of three weeks and then we extend for a week and then another week.

“And the kids say, ‘Are you ever coming home?’ And we say, ‘Only if we have to.’”

“We have been coming here for 12 years. It isn’t for the pools, and it isn’t for activities. We take ourselves on trips around the island to Hana, to Haleakala, and learn as much as we can. After a day or so, we literally drift into tropical paralysis—we are so glad to be here.

“When we went to the Big Island, there was a woman who taught Hawaiian language. She had Hawaiian letters on a Scrabble board. You had to make a Hawaiian word you knew.

“When you are listening to a song, you don’t know what they are singing about. Today, we can look at a street name and know what it means and how to pronounce it. We still don’t know much of the language, but what we did learn was that if you look at a word, you know how to pronounce it.”

“Our favorite things are snorkeling at Black Rock (Pu‘u Keka‘a, where royalty once dove to prove their valor), Honolua Bay, the 14-mile marker, and at Napili (a resort built by Canadians). We go to the hula shows. I don’t care how many times I’ve seen them.”

“(At home,) I will go on the computer and look at the Napili Kai and Sheraton webcams every day. ( at way) I come here every day.”

Chris:

44

e Visitor Experience

Chris isn’t here full-time yet, because she also loves the San Juan Islands in the summer. But someday, she will be. She movingly sums up her passion this way: “I could live here without a doubt. My heart is here. I want my ashes to be spread here—this is where my soul is.”

Knowing Maui More: Where there is no smoke…


there is no fire. The iconic Pioneer Mill smokestack, refurnished after the close of West side sugar operations, stands as a sentinel marking the location of the historic town of Lahaina. Stories about the three people most influential in preserving the history of Lahaina appear in my new book Voices of Aloha on Magical Maui. 

Getting to know Maui: Why this is the month for showers?

From the author of Voices of Aloha on Magical Maui 

No April showers for Maui (this is not the rainy season) . Instead you can enjoy  the blossoms of shower trees, making in this case a sea of yellow on  the  lawn of the Kaanapali Beach Hotel recently. You can see em, but you do not have to rake em.  

ENJOY THE MAUI YOU LOVE: Get my book and see what to do, where to go

For visitors and residents, the new book Voices of Aloha on Magical Maui offers daily words and provocative photos on the latest happenings on Maui from an award-winning journalist/author. What makes Maui, Maui are remarkable people of aloha who appear in my fourth book (available for purchase through the link above. at Maui Friends of the Library bookstores and other local stores.

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Welcome

For visitors and residents, the new book Voices of Aloha on Magical Maui offers  daily words and provocative photos  on the latest happenings on Maui from an award-winning journalist/author. What makes Maui, Maui are remarkable people of aloha who appear in my fourth book (available for purchase through the link above. at Maui Friends of the Library bookstores and other local stores.  

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 My fourth Book  is one of the few that showcases remarkable people who are part of the visitor experience. It also includes fascinating tales of  kings, queens, warriors and missionaries and how they transformed thee islands to  set the stage for today’s modern Maui.

Described by Maui Time Weekly as a hand guide for anyone who has been on the island 24 hours, Voices of Aloha on Magical Maui provides insights into  one of most popular tourist destinations in the world.  Maui Time Weekly says the author writings “are intriguing and illuminating.”

Chicago Tribune Rick Kogan in a radio interview said to the author: “you are the voice of Maui and have the same spirit as (Pulitzer Prize winner) Mike Royko. Your writing reminds me of what he used to write”.

The focus is short tales of a bartender who has made 400,000 mai tais, the surfer/hostess who once posed for Playboy, musicians, artists and colorful characters, the king who united the islands, the queen who lost a kingdom, missionaries, sugar and tourists kings who shaped modern Maui.

Readers will also to know and understand Hawaiians, what they do and what they think about the transformation of this wonderful place from monarcjy, to U.S. territory to state. and what they think say for those who want to understand their cultural experience while here.

Norm Bezane, awarded top two recognition for writing one of the top best feature newspaper columns in the State of Hawaii as well as one of the best independent journalists by the the Society of Professional Journalist’ s Honolulu chapter has included the best of 250 short profiles from his popular Maui newspaper column that debuted in 2006.

The unique accounts loved by visitors and “locals” alike are among the few that tell the story of contemporary remarkable people who have made Maui Maui, the greatest place on earth.

FB fans: Click link. What do whales and women’s hemlines have in common?

If you could guess you would be half right. Women’s hemlines go up and down.  The sounds whales make in the form of songs is getting lower and lower.  Coming soon: full reports on the culture of whales and worldwide efforts to untangle whales.  whale-tales-1-1Part three in a week-long series based on talks at this weekends Whales Tales sponsored by Hawaii’s premier whale research organization: Whale Trust.

What do Whales and Smiley Faces Have in Common: Seven Days of Whale Tales


Researchers who look closely at whales see white spots in photographs that look like smiley faces. The circles actually are shark bites. On a given whale there may be 30 or more in various stages of healing. The sharks get a bit of dinner. The whales, unharmed by the bites over time, have one more feature that makes them unique on earth (or rather in the sea).

THIS IS THE FIRST OF DAILY REPORTS, SOME FULL LENGTH STORIES, BASED ON TALKS AT THE FEB.25-26, BASED ON TALKS BY THE WORLD’S LEADING RESEARCHERS GATHERED TOGETHER BY WHALE TRUST MAUI, the premier group supporting whale research in the Hawaiian Islands. Three researchers are the subject of a profile in my new book.

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